16.9.14

NOT JUST A NUMBER TWO


It appears the number 2 is our favourite golf ball number. But instead of just selecting a type face we particularly like, we could instead use an illustration to make the top part of the number look like this. With the intention of expressing our environmental concerns for using fossil fuel derived materials (plastics such as polyester) in sport which are non-biodegradable.

If you consider the sport product life cycle may only be a few years and yet the non-biodegradable synthetic materials they are made from from will be around polluting the environment for hundreds of years.
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12.9.14

TWO LITTLE QUESTIONS


Two little questions.

Is it ok to use a little bit of a cancer causing substance in my moisture-wicking sports shirt?

Is it ok to use hormone disrupting chemicals which are still effective at very low levels in my sports shirt?
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11.9.14

GOLF DIGEST COVER


If we were the editors of Golf Digest magazine we’d put the following unseen sporting hero on the cover instead of Michelle Wie.

Phy Phearith – Cambodia textile worker."What I earn is not enough to live on, not even for one person. With overtime, I earn US$80 to US$90 a month. That's for a 10-hour day, six days a week.
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THEO COLBORN


In the late 1980s, Colborn, having earned a Ph.D. in zoology at age 58 after a first career as a pharmacist, made a disturbing discovery. A wide variety of predators in the Great Lakes of North America — fish, birds, reptiles and mammals — were suffering from reproductive disorders. They were also contaminated with industrial chemicals that had one thing in common: at the molecular level, they were structurally similar to the hormone estrogen.

Colborn's conclusion: these chemicals, present in everything from pesticides to plastics to cosmetics, interfered with the animals' endocrine systems, where hormones are regulated. Most of her colleagues were skeptical, but Colborn plunged into a frenzy of research, uncovering earlier studies that nobody had paid sufficient attention to and analyzing tissue samples from across the U.S. and Canada. "We had gonads flying around the country," Colborn told TIME in a 1994 story. By then she'd been appointed senior scientist at the World Wildlife Fund, where she directed the Wildlife and Contaminants program.
Colborn's tireless research resulted in the groundbreaking 1996 book Our Stolen Future, and over the past decade she's won over many of the skeptics. "Endocrine disruption has become a distinct discipline of its own," says Colborn, who retired from the World Wildlife Fund in 2003 and returned to her Colorado home to found the Endocrine Disruption Exchange www.endocrinedisruption.com, a clearinghouse for research and information on the topic. "The evidence is now overwhelming that prenatal exposure can lead to irreversible disorders," Colborn asserts. This would explain "the pandemic of endocrine-related diseases we're seeing, especially in the northern hemisphere," she says. "One out of three children born today will develop diabetes — and it's one out of two if you're a minority. Thyroid problems are everywhere."
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10.9.14

WHITE BEETLE BLACK BALL


White beetle black ball by Golf Refugees.
#golfrefugees #whitebeetle #blackball

White is everywhere in our synthetic world but in nature white is pretty rare. The beetle in picture; Cyphocilus, it blends in with certain white mushrooms in South East Asia.
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4.9.14

UNTRENDY


Untrendy is the new trend.
#untrendy
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WOULD YOU WEAR NETTLE?


Would you wear nettle? A hundred years ago German uniforms were made from nettle fibres. Nettles can grow on poor quality land /soil without the use of pesticides. The fibre is very strong in tensile, has elastic qualities and natural anti bacterial and flame retardant properties. We are currently investigating the opportunity to use nettle fibres in sportswear. With the objective of producing a lower environmental impact shirt with fewer toxic chemicals.

The dominant fibres today are cotton (non organic) and polyester. They also happen to be the most environmentally damaging; high pesticide usage for growing cotton, petroleum derived polyester with toxic heavy metals and additional chemical finishers. We need to divest funding into forgotten fibres such as nettle which are more environmentally friendly.
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