26.3.15

TENTS


A Coleman tent has a warning that it contains known carcinogens. Retailer said it was due to the polyester used in the fabric and that unless customers are consuming the fabric, it is safe to use.

There is little to fear from the polyester itself – it is the processing of the polyester in which chemicals that are carcinogenic are introduced. It may be the dyes used, it may be the yarn texturizers (often BpA) in the polyester yarns, or it could be something else. But since there are over 2,000 chemicals used in textile processing it is difficult to identify the carcinogenic chemicals used in this particular polyester tent. But as the tent comes with a warning, something that manufacturers will try desperately to avoid, they are there.

Which made us think that sportswear brands should consider a similar label warning 'contains cancer causing chemicals' on children's polyester based apparel?

Hey kids, don't suck your sport shirts.

Source: OEcotextiles
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24.3.15

SISTERHOOD


We often read about female sport stars giving their time and name to worthy causes, which is great.
But what would happen if a female athlete started to voice her concern for the low pay and conditions of the young female textile workers who make her sports clothes?
The apparel industry is, and has historically been, one of the most female-dominated industries in the world. Today, more than 70% of apparel workers in China are women, in Bangladesh the share is 85%, and in Cambodia as high as 90%.
Should female sport stars stand shoulder to shoulder with their sisters in the textile industry? Or would the athletes be ostracised by their sportswear sponsors?
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20.3.15

LIP SERVICE


Not a good day for sponsored Nike athletes. According to Greenpeace Detox signatory Nike are the biggest sportswear greenwashers. Only paying lip service to reducing hazardous chemicals and pollution in their clothes and supply chains. Time to ditch the swoosh for brands who care about how their apparel is made and what they are made from?
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16.3.15

FEAR


Who or what do you fear? Fear women's tee by Golf Refugees.
#fear #golfrefugees
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12.3.15

SEQUENCING


New 2015 organic polo shirt design from Golf Refugees based upon binary sequencing.
#sequencingpolo #golfrefugees

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11.3.15

WEARABLE CHEMICAL SENSORS


Apparently wearable sensor technology are going to be a big hit over the next decade. You'll be able to wear them either directly on your skin or within a textile article and measure various physical performance parameters.
Golf Refugees are particularly interested in wearable chemical sensors as they can detect via your sweat the presence of any toxic heavy metals.
Various toxic metals are soluble in sweat; Antimony (Sb), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Lead (Pb), Mercury (Hg).
Toxic heavy metals are used in modern sportswear primarily for textile dyes and pigments.
Chromium and nickel found in blue, navy, turquoise, green and grey metal-complex dyes. Copper and nickel found in turquoise and brilliant green shades in reactive dyes. Copper found in blue, green, grey pigment prints. Cadmium found in yellow, orange, red and green dyes. Lead and Mercury present in many pigments.
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6.3.15

GOLF TIP OF THE WEEK


You can pick up some great tips from watching pros.
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